Nutrition for PCOS: A Dietitian’s Guide

Nutrition for PCOS: A Dietitian’s Guide

Health
Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is a common hormonal condition that affects 1 in 10 women. For women of reproductive age, it affects 12-18% of individuals, although reportedly up to 70% of women with the condition remain undiagnosed. Polycystic literally means “many cysts.” Ovarian means it is in the ovaries. Therefore, PCOS stands for many cysts within the ovaries. Even though that is the translation, the diagnosis doesn’t rely on there being cysts. Some women may not even have cysts in their ovaries since the diagnosis involves having any two of these three factors: Lack of ovulation causing irregular menstrual cycles (either <21 days apart, >35 days apart or no cycle at all).Excess male hormone production (e.g. testosterone) detected through a blood test.Cysts on the ovaries as detected via ultrasound. Other…
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Supplements for PCOS: A Dietitian’s Guide

Supplements for PCOS: A Dietitian’s Guide

Health
When it comes to PCOS, there are quite a few supplements that can help. Prioritising your overall nutrition will help far more than what any individual supplement can do, but supplements can certainly provide some value. When it comes to supplements, often they are only beneficial whenever there is a deficiency or inadequate intake. Adding the supplement in addition to an already optimal intake likely won’t provide any additional benefit. So, keep that in mind since a lot of these needs can be met through food as well. Supplements are just the icing on the cake. If you would like to learn more about nutrition in general for PCOS, I recommend reading this post. PCOS can't technically be cured but these might help reduce symptoms related to menstruation, ovulation, fertility,…
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Melanie McGrice Q & A

Melanie McGrice Q & A

Other
Can you please tell us a little bit about yourself and your career? I have been a dietitian for around 15 years now and my passion is fertility, pregnancy and women’s health. It’s what we call ‘early life nutrition’ and I’m particularly passionate about that because I have come to learn that what a woman eats in the lead up to pregnancy, during pregnancy and then what we feed our babies during the first couple of years of life—that period of time is often called the first 1,000 days—and that has a humungous impact upon the genetics of our babies, which goes on to impact their future health. The research is currently suggesting that the next generation is actually going to have shorter lifespans than we will because of the…
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