Glutamine Supplementation & Gut Health

Glutamine Supplementation & Gut Health

GI Disorders
Glutamine plays an integral role in gut health. Around 30% of the glutamine that the body produces goes to maintaining and fuelling processes in the gut. What is Glutamine? Glutamine is the most abundant amino acid in the human body. It is often considered conditionally essential, meaning that our bodies can make it endogenously. Although, there may be times where we must get it from food. Intracellular concentrations of glutamine can be depleted when the body is under a significant amount of stress such trauma or sepsis.  During these times, the body may not be able to produce enough glutamine to keep up with the increased requirements by intestinal, renal, and immune cells. When usage of glutamine exceeds the endogenous glutamine production, it is then considered an essential nutrient. Glutamine…
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The Gut Microbiome & Low FODMAP Diet

The Gut Microbiome & Low FODMAP Diet

Other
The low FODMAP diet, created in Melbourne Australia, is one of the best, evidence-based ways to manage irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, it is also a very restrictive diet that limits a whole host of healthy foods that would otherwise nurture and improve our gut health. If you are on this diet for a long period of time to investigate your IBS triggers, it is a good idea to take extra steps to ensure that your gut microbiome is nurtured and not neglected.  What Is The Low FODMAP Diet? FODMAPs are short chain carbohydrates that are not well digested by the body. Instead of being broken down completely, they ferment in the gut.  Which is actually part of the reason they are beneficial for gut health.  But for people suffering from…
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Dietary Fibre: A Dietitian’s Guide

Dietary Fibre: A Dietitian’s Guide

Health
What is Fibre? Fibre is technically a form of carbohydrate. It consists of long strands of glucose, arranged in a way that the body’s digestive enzymes are unable to break down. Fibres’ resistance to digestion is due to how to it is organised in the grain, or, the way glucose is chemically bonded to itself. Either way, your enzymes are unable to breakdown the long strands into molecules small enough for the body to absorb. Unlike other nutrients, fibre moves through the gastrointestinal system un-digested and unabsorbed until it reaches the large intestine. Here, gut bacteria ferment fibre into by-products that are healthful and absorbed. Fibre has a unique role in the maintenance of overall gut health and it also is responsible for other benefits which many are unaware of.…
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Nature’s Hitchhikers

Nature’s Hitchhikers

Health
You could call them passive freeloaders; hitchhikers even. Roaming the avenues of our gut, residing in the dark alleyways of our intestine, and fuelling off the crumbs left by fellow tourists. And, just like hitchhikers, these little guys get it all for free. ZILTCH. NADA. A big fat ZERO. But, unlike hitchhikers, these little fellas don’t just come along for the ride; they give more than they take. In fact, without them, we as a human race would be virtually non-existent. ZILTCH. NADA. A big fat ZERO. Although their names extend far beyond the complexity of a German freeloader or a Swedish couch surfer, the microbes within the microbiome live in a land far beyond what any hitchhiker has the time (or the bodily dimensions) to explore. Yep. The microbiome…
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Prebiotics and Probiotics: What’s the Difference?

Prebiotics and Probiotics: What’s the Difference?

Health
You have probably heard the terms ‘prebiotics’ and ‘probiotics’ thrown around but what actually are they and what is the difference between the two? What is the difference between the two? Probiotics are live microorganisms found in bacteria, yeast or fungi, and when taken in large doses they can help improve and maintain the health of your gastrointestinal tract, as well as helping to aid digestion. In order for the good bacteria to survive in our bowels, we need to feed them with prebiotics. Prebiotics are non-digestible fibres that allow for good bacteria to stick to the bowel wall, whilst helping to stimulate their growth. Probiotic = live microorganismsPrebiotic = non-digestible fibres A simple way of thinking of it is the probiotics are the beneficial bacteria and prebiotics are the…
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Probiotics and Prebiotics

Probiotics and Prebiotics

GI Disorders, Health
Did you know that we have 100 trillion bacteria living in our gut?! While that may leave you feeling a little squeamish, don’t fear! These little guys are on our side, they play important roles in many metabolic, nutritional, physiological and immunological processes which keep us healthy. This includes acting as a barrier to prevent “bad” bacteria from invading and causing illness and producing nutrients that we can’t make ourselves (vitamin K, B12, folic acid, short-chain fatty acids). There is continual evidence which suggests incorporating prebiotics and probiotics into our diet is beneficial for keeping a healthy balance of “good” gut bacteria. So what are probiotics and prebiotics? Probiotics Probiotics are live microorganisms (bacteria or yeast) found in certain foods, which when consumed in adequate amounts are beneficial to our…
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