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How to become a dietitian in Australia

How to become a dietitian in Australia

Other
The path to becoming a practising dietitian in Australia requires first and foremost, a tertiary qualification. Throughout Australia, there are a variety of undergraduate and masters level programmes which when complete satisfy the entry-level requirements for the profession. To maintain the educational standard of dietitians in Australia, each program must satisfy the accreditation requirements of the Dietitians Australia governing body. A list of currently universities and their accredited dietetic programs in each state can be found here: Accredited Dietetics Education Programs.   Accredited Practising Dietitian After obtaining a tertiary qualification in dietetics, you typically also need to maintain a registration with the national governing body: Dietitians Australia (DA). The majority of employers in Australia require proof not only of your education (graduate certificate), but also professional registration and up-to-date skills…
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Is Pink Salt Healthier?

Is Pink Salt Healthier?

Food, Health
A common food trend over the last few years has been the increasing popularity and use of 'pink' or Himalayan salt. Despite the more striking appearance and common perception of it being 'healthier' and 'more natural', does it actually have any nutritional benefits beyond that of regular white table salt? A recently published paper funded by Nutrition Research Australia has shed some light on this topic, but before exploring what they found it is first useful to understand in detail what salt is. Some people use the terms 'salt' and 'sodium' interchangeably but it is important to understand the difference. Sodium is one component of salt. The chemical name for salt is "sodium chloride" and the chemical symbol that denotes table salt is "NaCl". By weight, the salt we eat is typically…
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Beetroot Juice for Endurance Performance

Beetroot Juice for Endurance Performance

Sports
One of the more interesting foods/supplements that has been gaining traction over the last few years is beetroot juice. Often times people, particularly endurance athletes, will spend a lot of time and money on things that do may or may not work in the hopes of a small increase in performance. At the top level, this small increase in performance can make a big difference in outcomes. Most supplements do not live up to the hype, but it looks like beetroot juice could be an exception to that, since it consistently seems to help people improve their performance. That being said, there is a bit of nuance to the topic and it certainly is not a magical supplement guaranteed to help you dramatically improve your time. How It Theoretically Works…
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Supplements for Bodybuilders and Powerlifters

Supplements for Bodybuilders and Powerlifters

Body Composition, Sports
When it comes to bodybuilding and powerlifting, we all know that training, rest and nutrition, in general, should be prioritised above supplementation. If you are looking to optimise your body composition and performance though, it makes sense to take advantage of any benefit you can. And while supplements might not be necessary to see great results, there are certain situations where they can help improve your results. This post is going to list common supplements used in the bodybuilding and powerlifting community and how they may or may not be beneficial. Creatine Creatine is one of the most well-studied supplements that consistently provides benefits. It is a naturally occurring non-protein amino acid that is found in foods such as red meat and seafood. But typically, people do not consume the…
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Nutrition For Strength Athletes

Nutrition For Strength Athletes

Body Composition, Sports
Strength and power athletes are typically looking to enhance power relative to body weight. This means some sort of resistance training is going to be a big part of their training. As with any type of training, proper nutrition has a significant impact on how well your body responds to and recovers from training. In strength training, nutritional objectives include: meeting caloric needs providing the optimal ratio of macronutrients (protein, carbohydrate, and fat) incorporating specific timing of meals/nutrition   providing optimal micronutrients (vitamins, minerals) ensuring sufficient hydration Energy, nutrient needs, and nutrient timing can differ vastly from person to person or in the context of different sports and training modalities. Just a few of the factors that come into consideration are age, gender, height, weight, level and intensity of training or…
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What is RED-S and What Should You Do About It

What is RED-S and What Should You Do About It

Health, Other, Sports
What is RED-S Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport, "RED-S" or simply "RED-S" is a clinically defined syndrome referring to the impairment of physiological function caused by a deficit in a person's energy intake relative to the energy required to maintain optimal health, homeostasis, growth, the activities of daily living, and sport.  Being in this state of relative deficit is often also referred to as being in a state of low energy availability (LEA). In this state, there is a lower than required amount of energy for the body's normal physiological functions. This can have a variety of health consequences including:  Altered metabolic functionMenstrual disturbances and amenorrhea (loss of period)Amenorrheic athletes have 2 to 4 times greater risk for a stress fractureImpaired bone health (increased osteoporosis risk) Reductions in immune system functionReduced protein synthesis (ie for…
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Are Refeeds or Cheat Meals Beneficial for Fat Loss?

Are Refeeds or Cheat Meals Beneficial for Fat Loss?

Body Composition
Refeeds or cheat meals/days typically involve either a day or meal that is significantly higher calorie than what is regularly being consumed. Generally, they are undertaken during a dieting phase where you are consistently in a calorie deficit. And from what I see, they are most often performed once per week, often on a weekend. A cheat meal is typically just a high-calorie meal which is generally high in carbs and/or fat. A cheat day or refeed day is a day that is usually either a day at maintenance calories (instead of a calorie deficit) or a calorie surplus. Refeeds and cheat meals/days are pretty much interchangeable phrases, although I prefer the term refeed since that implies that it is being utilised for purposes beyond just a break from the…
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FODMAPs, Vegetables, and IBS

FODMAPs, Vegetables, and IBS

GI Disorders
If you have read our previous posts on 'FODMAPs & Fruit', or 'The Low FODMAP Diet', you might want to skip over the intro below if you don't need a recap. If you're new to learning about the FODMAP diet I'd recommend also clicking on those other posts and having a read as they complement the below information! The Low FODMAP Diet is designed to help sufferers of IBS reduce and manage their symptoms. It was designed to be implemented in 3-phases, with the end goal of balancing the least restrictive possible diet with the greatest sustainable improvement in symptoms.  Phase 1 is the low FODMAP phase where Fructose, Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols are restricted from the diet to relieve symptoms and create a baseline to operate from. Suitable alternative foods should be found to…
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How Large Should a Calorie Surplus Be for Muscle Gain?

How Large Should a Calorie Surplus Be for Muscle Gain?

Body Composition
One of the biggest questions in the fitness space is how to gain muscle as quickly and efficiently as possible. And while a calorie surplus is not always necessary for gaining muscle, no matter how you look at it, a calorie surplus is going to be a necessary step for doing it in the most efficient way possible. If the goal were just to gain muscle as quickly as possible, it would make sense to utilise a large calorie surplus. But this is where efficiency comes in. A large calorie surplus is likely going to lead to a lot more fat gain and an unfavourable ratio of fat to muscle gain. This then either leads to more time having to be spent dropping body fat down the line, or just…
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FODMAPs, Fruit, and IBS

FODMAPs, Fruit, and IBS

GI Disorders
The Low FODMAP Diet is designed to help sufferers of IBS reduce and manage their symptoms. It was designed to be implemented in 3-phases, with the end goal of balancing the least restrictive possible diet with the greatest sustainable improvement in symptoms. Phase 1 is the low FODMAP phase where Fructose, Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols are restricted from the diet to relieve symptoms and create a baseline to operate from. Suitable alternative foods should be found to replace those being restricted. It usually lasts for 2-6 weeks. Phase 2 is a phase where the FODMAPs are individually tested to establish tolerance levels to specific foods. This process can take a significant amount of time as there are a lot of variations in the types of FODMAPs, serving sizes, and foods that need to…
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