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Performance Enhancement in Team Sports, Without Extra Training

Performance Enhancement in Team Sports, Without Extra Training

Sports
For some, team sports were left behind before high school. For others, team sport is carried through to adulthood, serving as a platform for socialisation and fitness. For few, team sport is a career. Whether you’re a professional athlete, or wanting to be, it’s good to understand the effect performance enhancing (ergogenic) aids can have on your performance. Before getting too deep, it is important to define what sort of exercise constitutes team sport. For example, the physiological demands on a soccer player are different to those on a volleyball player. Not only do we see marked differences between sports, but also within sports. For example, a rugby forward and back needing different skills sets and types of fitness. The extremely diverse nature of team sport is what makes it…
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Joyce Haddad Q & A

Joyce Haddad Q & A

Other
1) Can you please tell us a little bit about yourself and your career? I am an accredited practicing dietitian, accredited nutritionist and personal trainer. I am currently a PhD candidate with the CSIRO and Flinders uni looking into improving the diet quality of households (parents and children). I run my own business where I do private consulting, community and public health work and I teach fitness classes. 2) What are some of your favourite healthy snack ideas to recommend to clients? I am a sucker for peanut butter! Anything with that nutty goodness tastes delicious. So for those that enjoy peanut or nut butters, I usually recommend a date with ½ a teaspoon of peanut butter, or healthy seedy crackers with peanut butter and sliced banana. Otherwise, the good…
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Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load: The Interplay Between the Two

Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load: The Interplay Between the Two

Health
Glucose, commonly known as blood sugar is a monosaccharide, which means it is chemically the simplest form of sugar. Other monosaccharides include fructose and galactose. We then have disaccharides including lactose, which are two sugar molecules, and polysaccharides which are three or more sugar molecules. Both of which break down into monosaccharides during metabolism. When we eat food, it goes down into our stomach, where many digestive enzymes start to break it down. After a while, the partially broken-down food travels to the small intestine where it is further broken down. One of the molecules carbohydrates are broken down into is glucose. From the small intestine, glucose is absorbed into the bloodstream. As glucose is absorbed into the blood stream, blood glucose levels rise. The glycemic response refers to how…
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Nature’s Hitchhiker

Nature’s Hitchhiker

Health
You could call them passive freeloaders; hitchhikers even. Roaming the avenues of our gut, residing in the dark alleyways of our intestine, and fuelling off the crumbs left by fellow tourists. And, just like hitchhikers, these little guys get it all for free. ZILTCH. NADA. A big fat ZERO. But, unlike hitchhikers, these little fellas don’t just come along for the ride; they give more than they take. In fact, without them we as a human race would be virtually non-existent. ZILTCH. NADA. A big fat ZERO. Although their names extend far beyond the complexity of a German freeloader or a Swedish couch surfer, the microbes within the microbiome live in a land far beyond what any hitchhiker has the time (or the bodily dimensions) to explore. Yep. The microbiome…
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Carbohydrate Loading

Carbohydrate Loading

Sports
What is Carbohydrate Loading? Carbohydrate loading or carbo-loading, is a term used to describe a nutrition technique used by endurance athletes in an attempt to prolong optimal athletic performance and delay the onset of fatigue, or, ‘hitting a wall’. The Transformation of Food into Energy When we eat carbohydrate containing foods, they arrive at our stomach and begin to break down. From the stomach, the partially broken down food travels to the small intestine where it completely breaks down into many compounds, one being glucose. From the small intestine the glucose is absorbed into the blood stream. A hormone called insulin which is secreted by our pancreas, accompanies the glucose from the blood to our liver and muscle cells, where it is stored in the form of glycogen. From this…
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Nutrition in the Digital Age

Nutrition in the Digital Age

Health
Social media, arguably one of the most expansive and dominant media forms in recent times, has quickly grown to become a powerhouse of connections and information. From what started as a seemingly innocent way to connect and share our lives with friends and family, social media has transformed into an almost incomprehensibly-sized platform for practically anything you can imagine - ranging from budding a relationship to fostering a new business. Social media, whilst a great place to connect with loved ones, has brought along the opportunity for anybody and everybody to voice their opinions on almost every matter – including nutrition. When becoming a nutritionist only requires an internet connection With a simple web search, a world of information is readily available to be read, interpreted and used - but…
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Pregnancy Nutrition

Pregnancy Nutrition

Health
Pregnancy is experienced in many different ways. Some women talk about the magic of it all with dreamy eyes and glowing skin, while others roll around uncomfortably making silent wishes that this baby would just get out already. No matter how you experience pregnancy, it really is a miracle. A little human is growing inside of you, which will one day emerge and go on to live its own life (maybe create its own offspring one day). How do we give our child the best start? What can we do to ensure that our child lives a long and happy life? More and more research is suggesting that the very earliest of life stages are of upmost importance for future wellbeing. In utero nutrition is often underestimated by doctors and…
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Should you try intermittent fasting? The evidence.

Should you try intermittent fasting? The evidence.

Health
Have you ever wanted to: - Do a lot less cooking and cleaning? - Lose weight without starvation? - Spend less on food? - Target belly fat reduction? Then intermittent fasting may work for you! For most people, the call to try intermittent fasting comes from the desire to lose weight. While this may be the most recognised benefit of the diet, or more so, eating routine, there are other benefits too. Intermittent fasting (IF) is a type of eating pattern that requires you to skip one or more meals for a particular amount of time. Skipping meals allows you to automatically “cut calories”, giving you a calorie deficit that allows you to eat relatively freely at your other meal times. No calorie counting, macros or points to calculate. Plus…
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Gut-Friendly Foods

Gut-Friendly Foods

GI Disorders
Your gut is home to an entire ecosystem of gut microbiota (bacteria), which has a holistic influence on your health. There are tens of trillions of microorganisms (consisting of at least 1000 different species of known bacteria) that are responsible for helping our digestive systems break down food, filter toxins, absorb vitamins, support the immune system, and balance hormone levels that affect our moods. As a home doctor I always advise patients to look after their children’s and their own gut health, because so many elements of life can throw gut bacteria out of balance. In most cases you can keep your gut happy and healthy by eating a diet high in probiotic bacteria and prebiotic carbohydrates, as these promote the growth and activity of good bacteria. Together, probiotics and…
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Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Health
Type II diabetes mellitus (most often referred to as type II diabetes) is a disease in which your pancreas does not produce enough insulin (a hormone that helps our body maintain healthy blood sugar levels), or your body does not properly use the insulin it makes. As a result, glucose (sugar) builds up in your blood instead of being used for energy(1). ‘Blood sugar’ and ‘blood glucose’ are often used interchangeably. Your body gets glucose from foods that contain carbohydrates (we’ll refer to these as carbs for this post), such as bread, potatoes, rice, pasta, milk and fruit. You body breaks down these carbs into glucose. To use this glucose, your body needs insulin. If left untreated or improperly managed, diabetes can result in a variety of complications, including heart…
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